Evaluating Silicon Valley’s Racial Diversity Problem: On a Scale of 1 to 10, Silicon Valley’s Lack of Racial Diversity Is a 7

Credibility of The Article

The article “On a Scale of 1 to 10, Silicon Valley’s Lack of Racial Diversity Is a 7” on the website The Atlantic by Robinson Meyer is a credible source because it has a credible author, relevant sources, useful hyperlinks, and accurate facts.

About The Author

Robinson Meyer, the author of the article, is an associate editor for the website The Atlantic where he covers topics such as technology and climate change. In 2009, Robinson attended Northwestern University and obtained a Bachelor’s of Arts degree in Music in 2013. Later that year, he became a writer and editor for the website The Atlantic. In the article, Robinson has a link to his social medias such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Email as sources for me to find information about him. There are links to his other posts but I need to subscribe to The Atlantic in order to view it. Based on my research, Robinson Meyer is a credible author. Since The Atlantic is a credible news coverage website, I trust the author’s facts in his post.

Purpose of The Article

As a whole, the intended audience would be tech workers. However, this article is mainly aiming at Silicon Valley’s Tech Companies or anyone who are affiliated with the big name tech industry to inform them about the low statistics of African Americans and Latinos in the tech industry and it’s just going to be worse if the problem isn’t solved.

Rhetorical Techniques of The Article

The article is consists of facts and information on the statistics of the low representation of African Americans and Hispanics in the Silicon Valley tech companies. Moreover, the article contains emotion-arousing quotes from outside sources.  Owen Grover, iHeartRadio’s senior vice president and general manager, claims “Silicon Valley is still too white, too male and too focused on solving the problem of the young, single, and wealthy.” Another emotion-arousing quote is “the Valley’s greatest problem lied in its deep lack of self-reflection and the strong resistance to it” stated by Rashad Robinson, the director of ColorOfChange. On the other hand, the author has no affiliation with Silicon Valley tech companies and it doesn’t seem to have any bias.

Accuracy

The article contains the statistics of racial representation in Silicon Valley’s tech companies. Meyer states that African Americans and Hispanics contribute to 13% and 16% of the workforce respectively, but their statistics in large tech companies aren’t exceeding 5%. In addition, African Americans earned approximately 4.1% of computer science degree, but only 2% are hired by tech companies. All these facts are backed up by the article “Silicon Valley Struggles to Hack its Diversity Problem” from The Washington Post. Rashad Robinson, the director of the website ColorOfChange, stated that “the question of diversity is not just one about the numbers, or even a question about the culture of hostility and willful exclusion toward diversity for Black people and Latinos, it’s about the deep level of comfort with being in all-white and Asian spaces and not understanding the impact of that exclusion on the work and society” (Meyer). There are no information whether or not the facts have been refereed or reviewed, but it is free of grammatical errors, spelling errors, and typographical errors.

Reliability/Hyperlinks

Since, The Atlantic is a website for news coverage, the article contains credible information. In addition, the article contains materials from a well-known credible sources such as the article “Silicon Valley Struggles to Hack its Diversity Problem” from The Washington Post and an expert’s opinion from a website ColorOfChange. The Washington Post explores the gap between African American and Hispanic tech graduates with actual likelihood of them landing in tech jobs and their statistical representation in big Silicon Valley tech companies. ColorOfChange is an organization that is created to establish strategies for equality and justice for African Americans. There isn’t a non-web sources that provides as much legitimacy as the sources above. In addition, the post is written on November, 11, 2015, which is up-to-date.

Graph/Visual

The graph from The Washington Post compares the number of African Americans and Hispanic tech students to actual statistics of them as tech workers.

graph3

Conclusion

In conclusion, the article “On a Scale of 1 to 10, Silicon Valley’s Lack of Racial Diversity Is a 7” by Robinson Meyer of The Atlantic is a credible and trusted source because the information is accurate and up-to-date based on other credible sources such as The Washington Post and ColorOfChange. The article contains organized and accurate statistics that indicates the underrepresentation of African Americans and Latinos in the tech workforce. Overall, the author does an excellent jobs reporting the facts from other credible sources and researcher’s opinions on the racial diversity in the Silicon Valley without producing any potential bias.

Work Cited

Meyer, Robinson. “On a Scale of 1 to 10, Silicon Valley’s Lack of Racial Diversity Is a 7.” The Atlantic. Atlantic Media Company, 11 Nov. 2015. Web. 12 Oct. 2016.

Kang, Cecelia, and Todd C. Frankel. “Silicon Valley Struggles to Hack Its Diversity Problem.” Washington Post. The Washington Post, 6 July 2015. Web. 12 Oct. 2016.

Colorofchange. “ColorOfChange.org.” Color Of Change. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Oct. 2016.

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